Electrical Installations London - Electrical Contractors -Data Cabling Relocation Moves Adds And Changes

Electrical Installations for Data Centres

Data Centre Electrical Installation

Data centres and comms rooms are crucial assets for any modern business. By installing these hubs within your company you are laying the foundations for both growth and competitiveness. Data, after all, is a key aspect of competing in the digital age. And, as anyone working in an operational data centre will tell you, there’s a lot of it.

But you need these areas of intense processing and power to be working to their full potential. To put it simply: there is no room for error. If, for example, you lose your comms room power then the majority of your business operations will stop. And this will spell disaster for your productivity and profits. Clearly, it’s important to have a reliable setup, but how do you go about achieving this?

What are Data Centres and Comms Rooms?

Before we go any further it’s a good idea that we understand exactly what these data centres and comms rooms are. The good news is that both terms are interchangeable and mean the same thing, so there’s only half the learning you were expecting. So, what is a data centre? Well, it’s simply a central location where an organization concentrates the main engine of its IT and telecommunications equipment e.g. data storage, network servers and telecommunication networks.

What Do You Need to Install a Good Data Centre?

Seeing as your data centre will be housing essential business elements, as well as needing to stick to server room standards, it needs to be installed correctly. To achieve this make sure you take the following into account:

  • Planning: The complexities of a data centre dictate that planning is critical when it comes to an installation. It’s not as simple as deciding where to position equipment and where the plug sockets need to be installed. Instead, you need to invest considerable time into understanding what your business needs and how your budget can best achieve this. It’s then a case of formulating a strategy to put this into place and give your company the best comms room it can have.

 

  • Power is King: Without power your business won’t be able to operate. Therefore, one of the most important elements of any data centre install is a reliable power supply. It not only needs to be able to cope with your demand, but it needs to do so with the minimum of problems. No power supply, however, is 100% perfect. And this is why installing emergency backup power supplies – such as a UPS and generator installation – is the surest way to maintain operations.

 

  • Scalability: A good comms room will hopefully be matched by a good business which, over time, grows. But this growth needs to be taken into consideration when designing and installing your data centre. IT and telecommunication technology is complex and far from space saving. Accordingly, your comms room needs to take this into account, so make sure there is ample space to house additional equipment, power supplies and cabling.

A world-class data centre will become the lifeblood of your organisation’s technological activities. And it will have the potential to push your business to new heights. But the intricacies involved with this technology mean it’s difficult to get right. And this is why it pays to connect with professionals who can both advise you on the best way forwards as well as delivering on these promises.

Learn more about Data Centre Electrical Services or call to discuss your requirements.

CALL US NOW ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION SERVICES  020 3912 6200

PAT TESTING PORTABLE APPLIANCE TESTING - Electrical Testing

PAT Testing in the Workplace

A Quick Guide to PAT Testing for the Workplace

Electricity is a form of energy which can be exceptionally powerful and is used extensively in workplaces. It can be used to power offices, factories and shops in a variety of ways. But electricity can also be dangerous. Any workplace, packed full of electrical products, represents a significant risk to your staff and your customers. That’s why it’s crucial that you regularly test your electrical appliances.

The most common safety test carried out is PAT testing. It’s a series of checks which safeguards people coming into your business and ensures that you meet the Electricity at Work Regulations. You may not be familiar with the methods behind PAT testing, so we’ve put together a quick guide.

What is PAT Testing?

Portable Appliance Testing (better known as PAT ) involves the examination of electrical products to verify their safety and confirm they are fit to use. The procedure takes in the following checks:

  • A visual inspection of both the cables and the appliance to identify any significant damage e.g. split cables and exposed components
  • An insulation test which measures the quality of insulation that protects any parts of the appliance which carry a current
  • Carrying out an earthing continuity test to determine whether earthing conductors are suitable enough to protect against electric shock

A PAT test can be completed relatively quickly by connecting appliances to a PAT testing device. If the appliance passes the PAT test then it can continue to be used. However, any appliance that fails its PAT test must be removed from service immediately. Although not a legal necessity, it is considered good practice to label individual devices with a PASS/FAIL sticker.

Electrical Testing in the Workplace

The Electricity at Work Regulations state that all electrical systems must be maintained in order to prevent any form of danger. The regulations do not specifically indicate that PAT testing itself is a legal requirement, but the fact remains that it’s a crucial step in maintaining appliances. PAT testing is a guaranteed method for evaluating the safety of electrical appliances. As such, it should form a part of every organisation’s maintenance routine.

When it comes to PAT testing frequency it is recommended that these checks are carried out as per below:

  • Offices, Hotels and Shops: Electrical appliances that fall under the class 1 category – stationary and IT devices – should be tested every four years. However the recommended time between tests is much shorter for portable equipment (every two years) and handheld equipment (every year) 
  • Public Use: Stationary equipment, along with IT systems, should be tested every year if they are being used by the public. Class 2 appliances – those which do not require an earth connection – are also subject to this yearly test. However, any portable and handheld equipment that is handled by the public should be PAT tested every six months.

Final Thoughts

PAT testing is one of the simplest methods of protecting your staff and your customers. Not only does it help your business comply with the Electricity at Work Regulations, but it minimises the risk of electrical accidents. Accordingly, it’s vital that your business understands all PAT testing requirements and also adheres to the recommended PAT testing frequency periods. Most important of all is to work with competent PAT testers who can confidently certify your equipment.

 

Read more about Electrical Testing or call to discuss your requirements.

CALL US NOW Electrical Installation Services  020 3912 6200

Power and Lighting for Industry

Industrial Power and Lighting

Power and Lighting for Industry

When it comes to an industrial setting you need to make sure that you have the correct power and lighting in place. Without these crucial elements correctly installed, you are going to seriously struggle with your productivity. And this means that your business will be less competitive. Naturally, you want your business to be productive and competitive, so investing in the best power and lighting is of the utmost importance.

Why You Need the Right Power and Lighting

An industrial setting is both busy and dangerous, so safety is a vital factor. Power, of course, is the backbone of an industrial environment. But the methods by which power is supplied can be dangerous. Electrical cabling, for example, can cause numerous problems such as trip hazards; this is magnified in a situation where significant amounts of machinery are in use. And lighting is just as important. Industrial settings such as factories and refineries can be starved of natural light. Therefore, you need to ensure that these workplaces are lighted satisfactorily.

Modern Developments in Power and Lighting

Industrial landscapes have been part of our everyday lives for well over a century now. This is why there is such a huge industry based around supplying power and lighting solutions. But this doesn’t mean that all the relevant solutions are in place. The owners of industrial businesses may not even be aware of many of them. And, thanks to advances in technology, there is a revolution taking place in industrial power and lighting.

Some of the most exciting developments in this area include:

  • Smart Controlled Lighting Systems:

    The wonder of smart lighting has proved popular in domestic and office settings, but it has remained a stranger to industrial settings. However, this scenario is slowly changing. Wireless technology combined with powerful interfaces has opened up endless possibilities in the industrial sector. The systems are simple to install and allow you to customise your lighting needs with precision.

  • Under Floor Power:

    Industrial settings are busy workplaces and this calls for significant investment in health and safety measures. And one of the quickest and most direct ways to address this is with under floor power. Electrical equipment, of course, needs to be connected with cabling. But this cabling, aside from being unsightly, is also dangerous in an industrial environment. Under floor power addresses this by allowing you to run all cabling underneath walkways and work areas.

  • Temporary Lighting:

    Alternative solutions to lighting are always important to have; temporary lighting acts as not just a backup, but also a fantastic solution for working at night. Temporary lighting uses multiple lights that all connect to one power supply. It’s a solution which provides you with a portable lighting option that is perfect for any works taking place outdoors. It can also, if required, be implemented internally in case of any lighting failures.

 The Perfect Solution

It’s essential that businesses in the industrial market work with the best power and lighting solutions. Falling behind here will blunt your competitive edge and have a major impact on the safety of your workplace. However, industrial power and lighting systems are complex. And, due to the potential hazards of working with electricity, it is highly recommended that you team up with professionals. This will guarantee that your setup sticks to the relevant regulations and will be completed on time.

Read more about Electrical installation for Industry or call to discuss your requirements.

CALL US NOW Electrical Installation Services  020 3912 6200

Electrical Installation Services -Case-Studies

Electrical Installation Surveys During Covid-19

How can I get an electrical installation survey done during lockdown?

With the new guidelines on social distancing and the message to stay at home, installation surveys are becoming increasingly difficult or not possible to carry out in person.

However this time shall pass and those projects that need to be completed will still need to be undertaken. A delay in survey will lead to lag in quotation, approval and the project being mobilised and undertaken.

The aim now is to reduce that time lag by still carrying out the earlier part of the process using innovative techniques and systems to complete these surveys and quotations allowing clients to put these budgets into their cash flow so when social distancing is reduced these works can happen immediately.

How can surveys be completed without coming to my place of business?

The majority of surveys can still be undertaken “off site” and the more information that can be collated during this process the more accurate the quotation will be for the needs of the client.

The majority of the information doesn’t change whether it’s a meeting on site or an off-site discussion. The numbers of cables required, the number of users moving into a building, the requirement of the electrical installations, the timescales to complete these works.

Also the construction of the space can easily be communicated which with the knowledge of the project management team accurate quotations can be built. For example, does the space have a false ceiling, a false floor, is there dado trunking around the walls of the offices, how long and wide is the space and where is the electrical cabinet in relation to those requirements?

Drawings allow the process to be even more accurate and will show our quotation team a visual of the space to gauge distances, routes and requirements.

The final element which then allows a 99% accurate quotation is the provision of photos and videos. With the information above and photos or videos of the proposed requirements our team is confident that the quotation provided offsite will be as accurate as an on site survey.

If someone is still based at their offices or place of business a simple walkthrough the building with Facetime, Zoom or Whatsapp will allow our team to provide the quotations you need.

What Project Surveys And Quotations Can Be Undertaken Off Site?

The majority of projects can be quoted accurately off site and are especially suited to the following due to the similar nature of the spaces:

  1. Offices
  2. Warehouses
  3. Data Cabinet tidy ups and re-patching
  4. Audio Visual Installations and Video Conferencing
  5. Schools
  6. New office space where estimates are required (moving to new offices)
  7. Data Centres

What project surveys and quotations are not suitable be undertaken off site?

The following projects usually involve some deeper understanding of the requirements and survey of the spaces and even though these projects are not best suited to off-site surveys than can still be quoted with a quotation range as a budget which can then be confirmed with an on-site meeting once the opportunity arises.

  1. Listed building and building with restricted electrical installation routes / drilling

Due to the complicated routes and limitations on what can be changed, drilled and have containment fixed, an on-site survey is usually best for these buildings.

  1. Residential Homes

Homes by their nature have no obvious routes for electrical installations, so seeing the building internally from the start to end point is important. These projects are best suited to an on-site presence.

  1. External electrical installations and fibre optic links between buildings.

Using technology such as Google earth can assist in proving quotations for these works but in a population dense area such as London the routes externally between buildings or spaces sometimes follow many changes of direction and elevation which cannot be seen or understood off site.

The advantages of Projects during social distancing

With the ability to still provide quotations during the social distancing stage we can then follow through with structured cabling installations during the shutdown of many offices, schools and places of business.

The advantages are that the work can be completed win a much safer way as the premises are empty, the works can be completed in regular hours rather than incurring an out of hours installation cost and in some cases the works can be completed quicker and more economical as the absence of employees in the space allow the works to be completed faster.

Accuracy and Guarantee

The more information that is able to be communicated the more accurate the quotation can be for the client. However in 20 years of pricing so many different projects we know from experience that over 95% of projects we have quoted in the past from off-site information have resulted in no changes to the price, once an onsite meeting has followed to firm up requirements, and of the 5% that have had the change the price hasn’t deviated by more than 10%, once further information was known.

Therefore, during these challenging times if we provide an off-site electrical installation quotation for you based on the information received during a conference call and with the required supporting information we will honour that set price if the on-site follow up doesn’t change the pricing by more than 10%. In essence it allows the cost to increase by 10% and we will still complete the works at the originally supplied quotation

For those quotations that can’t be accurately quoted a range of budget pricing can be supplied and firmed up on site once the situation allows to still enable the clients to budget in their cash flow.

Call us to arrange a project surveys or a quotation, or simply to talk through your current project.

 

Tel:  020 3912 6200

 

Coronavirus - Impact on Technology and Electrical Installations

Covid 19, Coronavirus and the Impact on Technology and Electrical Installations

Coronavirus and the Impact on the Technology and Electrical Installation Industry. A Truthful assessment of what’s coming.

The impact of the coronavirus on the world as a whole, as we have all seen, has been massive and a large proportion of industries will be affected; technology and Electrical Installation will be no different.

Many of our clients have been asking us what effect this means on currently planned in work and upcoming proposed projects.

Below is our honest opinion on how this will affect the electrical  industry and where it can be incorporated into your companies industry.

The Impact on Installations, Essential Works and Safety

The complications with the current coronavirus is that no one knows how long it will continue, when work can return back to normal or even a small resemblance on what was previously normal.

Companies are concerned that having installers in their offices during these times risk exposure and spread of the virus and as a company we wholeheartedly agree that for the world as a whole we need to practice social distancing, and this starts with the eliminating or reduction of installations where exposure to other employees, trades or workers is non manageable.

This then leads on to what’s essential and therefore able to be scheduled.

Each company’s definition of essential will vary based on requirements, the infrastructure of the business and the overall impact that the delay in those structured cabling works will have on the operation of that business.

As a company we have seen essential works having to be completed for UK essential businesses such as Royal Mail, Banking and Finance where installation that were mid project were required to be completed unless the overall operation of those deliveries would be affected.

However, in a contrasting manner we have seen many projects be delayed or cancelled due to the lack of essential requirements. Projects have also been rescheduled where health and safety can’t be guaranteed for the end client or the installation companies involved.

The impact on Surveys, Meetings and Quotations

The biggest impact on the industry so far has been the reduction and almost elimination of meetings, surveys and the knock on affect to quotations and proposals for Electrical Installations.

With many staff now working from home there is now a lack of presence within all the companies and buildings that would be arranging installation surveys or design meetings.

(Especially in the London area where public transport is massively reduced and seen as a medium to avoid where possible.)

The effect on the industry is: Reduced surveys leads to reduced structured cabling quotations and reduced installation projects.

The effect overall is a positive for battling the virus as each reduced element increases the social distancing.

Opportunities, Smarter Working and Solutions

This period of upheaval will pass although no one knows how long and how definitive that timescale will be. Once the initial rise starts to flatten and more is known on how to manage the virus, the distancing and how people will start to return to work then focus will return to how all those projects that have been delayed can start to put into place.

This will apply for all industries, not only the technology and electrical industry.

The opportunity here is to plan in advance and undertake those surveys, processed the quotations and schedule the works in anticipation of the return to a somewhat normal working week.

As a company we are undertaking increased surveys offsite with a detailed almost interview like discussion over the telephone or video conferencing. In those situations where employees are still based within their offices, photos, videos and live streams are being used to survey these works and enabling detailed and accurate quotations to be supplied.

Also, where quotations are accepted and works agreed on as essential and safe to install, engineers are able to attend almost empty buildings and undertake these works in a safer manner than was ever possible.

Not only are the social distancing elements upheld but a larger proportion of health and safety measures are now massively minimised or eliminated. Health and Safety concerns such as removing false floors in an active office, working on ladders around employees and especially noise pollution within an office or heard in other company offices.

Summary

Is the upcoming period going to be difficult and an upheaval? The answer of course will be based on what your company does and how the virus plays out.

However what we do know is at this time we have more technology and ways of filling voids than we have ever had before and these can be used to bring an element of normality back to the survey, quotation and installation process within the Electrical Installation industry.

So while others stand still waiting to see what happens, allow us to use these opportunities to actually increase the effectiveness and completion times of those important projects and leave the rest of the precious time to getting back to normal within your business.

Smoke Alarm Regulations picture of smoke detector

Smoke Alarm Regulations

Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Regulations

It goes without saying that inhaling smoke and carbon dioxide is incredibly harmful for the body. Smoke has the potential to inflame your airways and cause respiratory failure. And carbon monoxide poisoning can also cause severe damage to the body. High levels of carbon monoxide reduce the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream which in turn, stops oxygen reaching tissues and vital organs. The end result can eventually be brain damage, heart failure and even death.

Thankfully, smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are available to protect you from these risks. However, it’s crucial that you and your alarms comply with the regulations.

What are the Key Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Regulations?

The Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Regulations were introduced in 2015 to improve fire safety and protect homes in the private rented sector. The main regulations that you need to be aware of are the following:

  • A smoke alarm needs to be installed on every storey of the premises that are either fully or partly used as living accommodation.
  • Carbon monoxide alarms must be installed in any room which is used, in any way, as living accommodation or contains an appliance that uses solid fuel burning combustion.
  • Smoke and carbon monoxide alarms need to be tested and confirmed as being in good working order when a tenancy commences.
  • Although not a legal obligation, it is recommended that landlords conduct regular testing to confirm that smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are in good working order.

All of these regulations are logical and sensible steps that can make a significant difference to the safety of all properties. But how do you make sure you comply with them?

How to Comply with the Regulations

It’s down to private landlords to install smoke and carbon monoxide alarms in their rented properties, so they need to take the initiative to comply with the legislation. If you’re a landlord then you need to take note of the following:

  • It’s important to understand what constitutes a storey used as a living accommodation. A bathroom may not feel like a living accommodation, but the Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Regulations classes it as one. Meanwhile, a floor of a property which is purely used for access is not classed as a living accommodation and does not need an alarm.
  • There is no obligation to install a specific type of smoke or carbon dioxide alarm. As long as the alarm is in good working order and capable of detecting threats then it will comply with the existing regulations.
  • All alarms need to be installed and operating from day one of any new tenancy. Therefore, to avoid hefty fines, it is recommended that checking the status or existing alarms (or installing new ones) should be one of the earliest steps to take when renting a property.
  • Once a tenant moves in it is down to the tenant to regularly test the alarms with a recommendation of once a month. However, it is recommended that private landlords also take the initiative to test the alarms in order to maximise safety and guarantee peace of mind.

Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Legislation UK

By following the regulations to the letter, private landlords can rest safe in the knowledge that they will be providing properties which are safe for tenants. See the current Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm (England) Regulations here

For more information or for help and installations contact us now

RCD residual current device

What is an RCD?

What is an RCD and How Does it Work?

 

RCD, or residual current device

A residual current device (RCD) is one of the best ways to protect yourself from electrical equipment. Accidents, after all, can happen. And the dangers of electricity mean that the consequences of these accidents can be severe and even fatal. By installing an RCD into your electrical systems you can significantly reduce the risk of electric shock.

Understanding what an RCD is and how it works could make a real difference to the safety of your electrical equipment, so let’s take a closer look at RCDs.

How Does an RCD Work?

An RCD is a safety device which is able to detect faults in electrical supplies and immediately switch the circuit off. This prevents the flow of electricity and provides protection against electric shocks. For example, a sudden surge of electricity will cause the RCD to trip out and shut down the current. As mentioned earlier, this reduces the risk of electric shock, but it also prevents the risk of electrical fires developing from faulty equipment.

Types of RCD

There are more than one type of RCD and the most common ones you will encounter are:

  • Fixed : Typically found within a fuse box, a fixed RCD delivers the best protection against electric shocks. A fixed RCD is capable or protecting individual circuits and more complex setups which are comprised of multiple circuits. This type of RCD is, given its fixed position, constantly providing protection to your circuits.

 

  • Portable : As the name suggests, a portable RCD can be moved to wherever it’s required. A portable RCD is most commonly used when your options are limited for installing an RCD such as on a construction site. The portable RCD simply plugs into an available socket outlet and is then ready to have an electrical device plugged into it.

 

  • Socket Outlet RCD: Replacing a standard socket outlet, a socket outlet RCD provides a much safer option for working with electrical devices. They are commonly found in extension cables and used for outdoor appliances such as lawnmowers.

What would trip an RCD?

An RCD is considered a highly reliable device and will prevent electrical shocks in around 97% of all cases. Naturally, this is a success rate which is highly favourable to your well-being, but it is not a 100% guarantee. Therefore, you should always be careful when working with electrical applications and RCDs by following these best practices:

  • Test Your RCDs
    All RCDs will have a test button built into them so that you can test that they are working and will disconnect the circuit. You should run a test on each RCD every three months to confirm that they are in good working order. If the test button does not activate the trip then contact an electrician to investigate this further.

 

  • Check Your Wiring
    It’s important that any electrical installations (and the RCDs themselves) are checked every 10 years. Wiring can deteriorate over time and circuits can easily malfunction, so it’s crucial that you cover every base rather than relying on the promise of an RCD alone.

For more information on RCDs and the options available to you, don’t hesitate to get in touch with one of our expert engineers.

LED-Lighting

How much do led lights save?

LED Bulbs: How Much Can You Save?

How-Efficient-are-LED-Lights-We’re well aware of the benefits that LED bulbs come packed with. Not only do they have long lifespans, but they also produce unrivalled levels of brightness and embrace energy efficiency. The beauty of all these benefits is that they combine to deliver a lighting solution which is high performance and cost effective.

But how do LED Bulb costs compare to those of traditional lighting methods?

How Efficient are LED Lights?

The traditional method of lighting for homes has always centred around incandescent light bulbs. But advancements in technology have led to the emergence of LED bulbs as the new kings of lighting. Many people initially shied away from upgrading to LED bulbs. Change is always a difficult concept to get to grips with and many consumers have stuck to what they know. Especially when they see the price of LED bulbs. But that initial price tag can be misleading.

Do LED lights really save you money?

There’s no escaping the fact that LED bulbs cost more than traditional lighting methods. An 8W LED bulb, for example, costs around £3.50. Its incandescent equivalent – which would be rated at 60W – will cost just £1.50. That’s an 80% price difference. And that would appear to be significant. But it’s not as clear cut as the initial expense being the deciding factor.

LED bulbs, you see, have a wide range of benefits. And these benefits far outweigh those offered by traditional incandescent bulbs. Let’s take a closer look at how these benefits can lead to long term savings:

  • Lifespan: An LED bulb should be expected to last for 50,000 hours. This gives you value for money in the long term when you consider that an incandescent bulb will only last for 1,000 hours. Therefore, one LED bulb will last as long as 50 incandescent bulbs. Using our 8W/60W comparison, that equates to a saving of £71.50 over the course of the LED bulb’s life. 
  • Energy Costs: One of the main areas where LED bulbs thrive is their energy efficiency. An LED bulb will always use a smaller wattage compared to an incandescent bulb. And this means that less energy is required to power the LED bulb. Less energy equals less cost. If we assume an energy rate of £0.18 kWh, then an 8W LED bulb – used for 4.5 hours a day – will cost £2.37 over a year’s usage compared to £11.83 for a 40W incandescent bulb. 

Is it worth switching to LED lighting? LED-Light-Bulb

An LED bulb is going to be the more expensive option when it comes to the initial purchase. But it turns out that LED lights are playing the long game in terms of price. With a lifespan that far outstrips that of an incandescent bulb, an Low energy bulb is a purchase which will outlast dozens of incandescent bulbs. And the low energy costs generated by LED guarantees you savings on your annual energy bill. Clearly, upgrading to LED is the way forwards in terms of lighting your home.

Learn more about how you can save money on your Industrial and Warehouse Power and Lighting

What is EICR?

EICR – Electrical Installation Condition Report

Electrical Testing-ELECTRICAL-INSTALLATION-TESTINGOur homes and workplaces rely on electricity to power the many devices we need to live and survive. But we have to make sure these devices are safe. Electricity is a powerful form of energy and can cause serious injuries when it gets out of control. Clearly, it needs to be respected and regulated. One of the most conscientious ways to achieve this is through an electrical installation condition report (EICR).

Why Do You Need an EICR? 

Electrical installations, like any product, age over time and this deterioration can cause malfunctions. Sometimes the end result will be that the device is broken and simply won’t work. But, at other times, the malfunction will lend itself to something more serious such as electrocution. Therefore, it’s important that these electrical installations are regularly monitored. This objective should ensure that the device maintains a level of safety that protects anyone using it.

What is Involved in an EICR?

When it comes to completing an EICR then there’s one thing you need before starting: a fully qualified electrician. The knowledge required to complete an EICR involves understanding the BS7671 IET Wiring Regulations and is not something you can quickly brush up on beforehand. So, you need an electrician in place. And once they begin an EICR they will look at the following:

  • Visual Inspection:

    The first port of call will be to carry out a visual inspection to identify any issues caused by wear and tear e.g. damaged cables or power switches. These are often the most obvious risks present in electrical installations. Also, the presence of any outdated standards or equipment needs to be addressed during this section.

  • Electrical Testing:

    This is comprised of two sections: live testing and dead testing. Live testing looks to test disconnection efficiency in the presence of an electrical fault and the suitability of residual current devices for preventing electrocution. Dead testing concentrates on investigating resistance, polarity and continuity of any circuitry in place.

How Often Do You Need to Complete an EICR?

Until recently, landlords were not legally obliged to complete an EICR. However, the government has announced that an EICR will soon become mandatory. This move has been taken to safeguard properties, tenants and landlords from the risk of serious injury and ensure safer living standards. The guidelines for an EICR will require that the report is completed every five years to guarantee a level of safety that takes into account any deterioration of electrical installations.

There are, of course, other instances in which it is recommended to complete an EICR such as:

  • Following any major damage to a property such as flood or fire damage. These forms of damage can compromise electrical installations and render them dangerous to use. An EICR will help to identify any major defects caused by such events and allow you to rectify them.
  • Before a property is sold or is being prepared to let is an ideal time to complete an EICR as it will provide peace of mind to any new tenants or property owners.

For more information on whether you need an EICR, or what it involves, don’t hesitate to get in touch and speak to one of our expert engineers.

Common Electrical Problems around the Home

Common Electrical Problems

Common Electrical Problems around the Home

We rely on electricity like no other form of energy when it comes to powering our homes. Ovens, hot water and lighting are just three examples of how our homes rely on electricity. But electricity is not without its problems. And, due to the ubiquity of electrical appliances in the home, these problems can soon mount up.

Electricity, of course, can be dangerous when it’s not regulated correctly. So, to prevent a serious injury, it’s important that you understand when something is wrong. Thankfully, you don’t need a degree in electrical engineering to identify these problems.Is Your Electrical Equipment Safe

What Are the Most Common Electrical Faults?

It’s likely that, even with the most modern homes, you will encounter multiple electrical faults every year. Some, of course, will be serious whereas others will be considerably less dangerous. Nonetheless, it’s important to identify them, so let’s take a look at the most common electrical problems around the home:

  • Old, Faulty Wiring:

    One of the most dangerous electrical faults is the presence of old wiring. Much like any consumable product, wiring is prone to deterioration and can soon fall into an unsafe state. Insulation can break down and expose live wires. Older wiring can be of a low amperage unable to cope with modern demand. All of this can increase the risk of electrical shock and fire damage. Updating electrical panels to a higher amp capacity and inspecting any intermittent faults is crucial.

 

  • Electric Shocks:

    The most obvious electrical fault is the one which discharges electricity through our bodies: the electric shock. They most commonly occur when turning electrical devices on or off. It’s always difficult to determine whether it’s faulty wiring or down to the device itself, but the best way to identify this is by consulting with an electrician.

 

  • Circuit Breakers Tripping:

    A circuit breaker is in place to prevent surges in electricity. These surges are most often caused by the simultaneous use of electrical appliances using large amounts of electricity e.g. microwaves and tumble dryers. When the circuit breaker trips the supply of electricity is instantly cut off. This can be inconvenient, but is easily avoided by understanding which items run off which circuit. This knowledge will allow you to limit the usage of items on the same circuit at the same time.

 

  • Frequent Light Bulb Failures:

    It’s always irritating to be left in the dark and we feel this most keenly when light bulbs fail. But sometimes this can happen too regularly for comfort. These failures will usually be limited to one light fixture and this indicates a specific fault with that fixture. These faults may be down to issues such as the supplied wattage being too high or faulty wiring going to the fixture. And, in these cases, it’s best to contact an electrician to investigate further.

 

  • Electrical Surges:

    An electrical surge is any sudden increase in current or voltage through an electrical circuit. While these surges only last for a fraction of a second they can, over time, cause serious damage to your circuits. The most common cause of these surges tends to be a faulty electrical appliance. And the best way to identify the piece of equipment is by removing each one from the electrical supply and monitoring for future surges.

Who to call for electrical problems

It goes without saying that you shouldn’t attempt to fix electrical faults unless you are a qualified electrician. Electricity can be incredibly dangerous, and safety should always be the number one priority. Once you identified that you have one of these common faults, or any other electrical problem, call in an expert to be sure it is fixed quickly and safely.

If you suspect you have any electrical faults please give a call

Call us now: 01923 587 586